ICE APPLE: I recently found a bottle of ICE APPLE WINE on our quality control retention rack from vintage 2010. This wine had six years of bottle age. I was not quite sure what to expect prior to opening it. So we pulled the cork on this oldie and poured. This wine was gold in color, but not to the point of being browned. The aroma of the frozen apples was still very strong and pleasant. The wine developed complexity from being bottle-aged with beautiful caramel hints but showing no oxidation, just a nice ripe apple aroma and nice bottle-age bouquet. (“Aroma” in wine refers to the fresh fruit or grape aromatics. “Bouquet” is everything else that happened to the wine during storage, barrel treatment, aging, etc.) I am guessing that this wine has aged to about its peak, maybe another year in the bottle under optimum conditions. So six or seven year’s bottle age for this type of Logan’s View Winery ICE APPLE wine seems appropriate.

CHAMBOURCIN 2008: We normally recommend a maximum of 3 to 4 years for this Chambourcin, but this was nine years old! It was showing its age, but it was an excellent example of a beautifully-aged dry red wine for about half an hour after we opened it. There’s a delicate bouquet reminiscent of cedar, tobacco leaves and violets that an oak-aged red wine will achieve after long time in its bottle, and this wine had it!

We still recommend around two years maximum bottle age for our fruit wines, and maybe up to four years for barrel-aged Chambourcin, but it was nice to learn that LOGAN’S VIEW wines can age with good results.

Enjoy your wines!

Steve Bahn